Snap-E Review

13 min read| Updated for March, 2019

If you have a mouse in your house, or perhaps a full-on mice infestation, you’ve likely considered the traditional spring-loaded snap traps. While the old-fashioned wooden versions might be the first that come to mind, several varieties of these traps are now on the market.

Snap-E is a popular mouse trap line from Kness Pest Control, and we like this mouse snap trap for a few reasons. We’ve checked out this model to give you the Snap-E review for their version of a spring-loaded mousetrap.

BEST

6 Pack

wildliferemoval.com

Snap-E Mouse Trap

Overall Rating

4.5 stars

Cost

Ease of Use

Quality

Safety

Last update on 2019-11-16 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Pros

  • Highly rated by users
  • Reusable several times over
  • Budget-friendly
  • No poisons to worry about
  • Instant kill when triggered correctly
  • Six-pack for various placement
  • Easy-to-clean/non-porous surface
  • Bumper helps prevent cutting/less mess

Cons

  • Use caution with fingers, pets, and children
  • Must see and clean up dead rodents
  • Will not snap if not triggered correctly

OUR VERDICT

The Snap-E Snap Trap is a remarkably well-designed version of this type of mousetrap. With a cleanable surface, a no-cut bumper on the wire, and an outstanding low cost, we love these traps for a relatively humane and quite affordable mouse control solution.

Our Review

After carefully studying the Snap-E Snap Trap, this mousetrap came in among our favorites for rodent control. The price for this six-pack of spring-loaded traps is unbeatable, and the user feedback is fantastic.

We also like that these traps are resistant to stains and odors, unlike the traditional wooden version of snap mousetraps. That’s a feature not often thought about before purchasing snap traps. Spring-loaded models do unfortunately get a bit messy at times, but the Snap-E version is designed well for this.

While spring-loaded snaps come without the concern of poison and are cheaper than electronic mouse traps by a mile, these styles of traps do involve a little cleanup.

Snap-E added a yellow “bumper” to the wire to help stop any cutting through skin, which goes a long way in preventing any blood from a catch.

The Snap-E version can be reused over and over thanks to their ability to be cleaned thoroughly—no porous wood here. The reuse of these traps makes the already low cost and even better value. Remember, all rodents can potentially carry diseases themselves or through fleas. Always wear gloves when disposing of any catch in these traps and disinfect the area thoroughly.

If you set the trap lightly, it will appear set, but the trigger will not get tripped when a mouse takes the bait. 

Triggering Snap-E Traps

Those familiar with the old-fashioned type of snap traps are likely used to triggering spring-loaded mousetraps lightly to maximize its sensitivity to being tripped. Snap-E traps are a bit different. You will need to press the bar down firmly until you notice a tiny snap and light bounce to the platform of the trap.

If you set the trap lightly, it will appear set, but the trigger will not get tripped when a mouse takes the bait. This may cause some users to attempt to set these traps even more lightly, increasing the problem. Snap-E traps have their own specific design and need a firm press when setting their trigger.

If you over-bait the trap itself, a mouse will not be able to eat much of anything before the rodent trips the trigger.

Baiting Snap-E Traps

It is crucial not to over-bait a snap trap. Leading mice to the trap with a few crumbles—a few is the key—is a brilliant way to bring them closer to the trap. If you over-bait the trap itself, a mouse will not be able to eat much of anything before the rodent trips the trigger. This can bring other mice to the area while sniffing out food.

If this transpires, you run the risk of the following mice eating the bait while also being deterred in the future from getting near an open snap trap. While these rodents are small, you’d be surprised how intelligent they can be when it comes to outsmarting traps and learning what to avoid if they sense danger. Just a tiny bit a bait on the trap with a few small crumbles of cheese or another lure is an excellent way to lead a mouse to the device, without bringing in hordes behind it.

Where to Put Mouse Snap Traps

Placement of these types of mousetraps is imperative. Mice (and rats) tend to run along the lines of fences, foundations of buildings, garages, and walls. These animals will avoid running across open spaces for long periods if they can avoid it.

If you have a mouse indoors, you probably already know that cabinets, pantries, attics, and garages can be especially active areas for mice. Placing your snap traps in these locations will increase your odds of getting lots of catches. Cabinets mice already entered that contain food, around garbage cans in the garage or the side of the house, and anywhere you spot droppings are prime locations.

If you don’t know the area with the highest activity of mice, place your snap traps in at least three or four various locations and check back the next day. 

If you don’t know the area with the highest activity of mice, place your snap traps in at least three or four various locations and check back the next day. It’s a smart idea to write down every spot you place a trap, so you don’t forget about one and find a weeks-old catch later.

Wherever you get the most catches, add more traps to the area, as several mice could be congregating during the night. If you have a sizeable infestation, you may end up with several mice in these traps in a single night. This can also be a helpful gauge to see what you’re up against. Sometimes it may seem you only have a few mice, when in fact, you have a more significant problem on your hands.

Disposing Rodents After a Catch

Once you find a mouse (or sometimes two in these traps), it’s vital to dispose of the body immediately. Be sure to wear gloves every time you clean a trap. Grab a plastic bag, check to make sure the plastic has no holes in it if you’re using a grocery sack, and carefully open the trap to release the catch into the bag.

 You can clean the trap itself by wiping it down with lint-free cloths or paper towels dampened with hot water.

Tie the plastic securely and dispose of the smaller bag in lined garbage away from other animals, pets, or children. You can clean the trap itself by wiping it down with lint-free cloths or paper towels dampened with hot water. Throw the rags away and grab new ones to cleanse the trap meticulously. If you do not use disposable materials, soak any fabric that was used to clean the trap in a bleach and water mixture, and then wash with a bleach cycle with hot water to sanitize thoroughly.

Using sanitizing wipes or sprays on these traps can deter mice from getting near them. We recommend avoiding any harsh chemicals to clean them until you’re ready to sanitize them for storage. Once you no longer see any signs of mice and are not getting any more rodents in the traps, you can disinfect the traps thoroughly and store them in case they’re needed for future use.

Summary

For a budget-friendly, poison-free mouse control solution, spring-loaded traps are an evergreen solution for a good reason. They work well and almost always kill quickly, rather than the slow death of rodenticides. If you already know you want to use snap traps for a mouse problem, we found the Snap-E version to be among our favorites.

We love the extra thought the company put into the little things such as the bumper for less mess, the easy-to-clean surface, and the extra-strong trigger. If you only have experience with the classic wooden style, we think giving Snap-E a try with worth the small cost to give them a try.